Please note: This course will be taught in hybrid mode. Hybrid delivery of courses will include synchronous live sessions during which on campus and online students will be taught simultaneously.

Daphne C. Watkins, Ph.D., is a professor of social work and a University Diversity and Social Transformation Professor at the University of Michigan (USA). She has taught research methods for more than two decades and developed the first Certificate Program in Mixed Methods Research at the University of Michigan School of Social Work in 2013. The certificate program — designed for researchers and practitioners interested in doing mixed methods research in practice settings — was the motivation behind her first book Mixed Methods Research (2015, Oxford University Press), for the Pocket Guides to Social Work Research Methods Series. In 2022 she published Secondary Data in Mixed Methods Research (SAGE Publications) as a how-to guide for researchers who want to incorporate secondary data sources in their mixed methods projects. In addition to developing culturally-appropriate strategies for conducting mixed methods, Dr. Watkins developed the Rigorous and Accelerated Data Reduction (RADaR) technique, an individual and team-based approach to organizing, coding, and analyzing qualitative data. Professor Watkins is the founding director of the Gender and Health Research (GendHR) Lab and the award-winning Young Black Men, Masculinities, and Mental Health (YBMen) Project, which leverages technology to provide mental health education and social support to young Black men and boys. She currently directs the Vivian A. and James L. Curtis Center for Health Equity Research and Training at the University of Michigan.

Course Content

Aspiring social scientists often wonder, “what is mixed methods research?” and “when should I use mixed methods in my research?” But before making decisions about using mixed methods research, other questions should be considered, such as “what is my philosophical stance?” and “what is my research question?” In this course, I will introduce students to mixed methods research in the social sciences. This course will provide depth and breadth on developing well-refined and theoretically driven mixed methods studies, along with guidance on using appropriate methods and instruments during data collection, integration, and analysis. The course content will be enhanced by an overview of both qualitative and quantitative methods, separately, then an examination of these methods together, and their valuable contributions to mixed methods research. The course provides (1) an introduction to mixed methods research; (2) an examination of the philosophical assumptions that guide the decision to use mixed methods research; (3) a context for data analysis and integration; and (4) a framework for drawing conclusions from mixed methods that inform future research, practice, and policy. A primary aspect of the course will be to teach students how to determine if mixed methods are necessary, given the problem statement and research questions.  

 

Course Objectives

By the end of the course, students will be able to: (1.) Adopt a philosophical stance and highlight the major theoretical underpinnings guiding mixed methods research; (2.) Determine when someone should consider conducting a mixed methods study and understand the procedures for choosing a mixed methods design; (3.) Discuss measurement, sampling, and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data for mixed methods research; (4.) Describe ways to integrate and interpret qualitative and quantitative data to address a mixed methods research question; and (5.) Identify ways to disseminate results from mixed methods research. 

 

Course Prerequisites

This is an introductory course. Participants are not required to have anything more than basic knowledge, comfort, and familiarity using one (or both) of the single methods (qualitative or quantitative). 

 

Required text  (this text will be provided by ESS):

Watkins, D. C. & Gioia, D. (2015). Mixed methods research. Pocket Guides to Social Work Research Methods Series. Oxford University Press: New York, NY. ISBN 9780199747450.

 

 

Day 1: Introduction to mixed methods research  & philosophical stance 

Lecture: Define mixed methods research and how it fits into social science research methodology and methods.  

Lab: Exercises to explore interests in mixed methods research, course goals, and personal philosophical stance.  

  

Day 2: History of mixed methods, ethics, and the responsible conduct of research 

Lecture: The origins and purpose of mixed methods research. The history of research ethics and the responsible conduct of research. The role of theory in conducting responsible mixed methods research. 

Lab: Exercises to explore mixed methods with under-resourced communities and making culturally-sensitive decisions. 

 

Day 3: Developing the research question & choosing a mixed methods design 

Lecture: Determine when someone should consider conducting a mixed methods study. Describe the language and notation used in mixed methods research. Name the mixed methods designs. Understand the procedures involved with choosing a mixed methods design. 

Lab: Exercise on writing mixed methods research questions and the different  parts of a “good” mixed methods research question 

  

Day 4: Collecting QUALITATIVE data 

Lecture: Identify under what conditions qualitative data should be collected. Discuss how to conceptualize and operationalize qualitative research. Discuss measurement and sampling in qualitative research studies. 

Lab: Collecting qualitative data exercise. 

  

Day 5: Analyzing QUALITATIVE data 

Lecture: Review and discuss ways to analyze qualitative (e.g., interviews, focus groups, observation data, videos, social media data, etc.) data for mixed methods research. 

Lab: Analyzing qualitative data exercise. 

  

Day 6: Collecting QUANTITATIVE data 

Lecture: Identify under what conditions quantitative data should be collected.  Discuss how to conceptualize and operationalize quantitative research. Discuss measurement and sampling in quantitative research studies. 

Lab: Collecting quantitative data exercise. 

  

Day 7: Analyzing QUANTITATIVE data 

Lecture: Review and discuss  ways to analyze quantitative data (descriptive and inferential statistics) for mixed methods research. 

Lab: Analyzing quantitative data exercise. 

  

Day 8: Qualitative/Quantitative  data integration & interpretation – Part 1 

Lecture: Part 1 lecture on various  ways the quantitative and qualitative data from mixed methods projects can be integrated and interpreted. 

Lab: Qualitative/Quantitative  data integration & interpretation, part 1 exercise. 

  

Day 9: Qualitative/Quantitative data integration & interpretation – Part 2 

Lecture: Part 2 lecture on various ways the quantitative and qualitative data from mixed methods projects can be integrated and interpreted. 

Lab: Qualitative/Quantitative  data integration & interpretation, part 2 exercise. 

 

Day 10: Writing and reporting mixed methods research 

Lecture: Writing up MMR and develop reports that describe the study design, methodology, and findings from a mixed methods study for peer-reviewed journals, theses/dissertations, grant proposals, etc.  

Lab: Writing and reporting mixed methods research exercise.